It depends on their diet! For most young children, their food intake tends to balance out over time. Each day will likely not contain appropriate amounts of grains, protein, dairy, fruit and vegetables.

This is not going to be a post telling you how to sneak vegetables into your child’s meals, rather why you should not do this!

Remember the Feeding Relationship rules. The only role of the child is to determine how much or if they eat what they are offered.

This may be a worry, especially if your child is small or thin. Genetics and our child’s growth patterns are good indicators of their health. The 50th percentile on growth charts is not the weight “goal” for your child.

Regardless of if we think our child is eating too much or not enough, we really need to let it go. This is taking a leap of faith, but trust that your child will eat the amount he/she needs.

From 7-12 months, babies need 11mg of iron. This is more than an adult male!  It is used to transport oxygen around the body and is important for energy and brain development.

A main premise (and big benefit!) of baby-led weaning is to feed the baby family meals, so you don’t have to go to a lot of effort to make separate “baby food.”

Research shows that gluten introduction should occur no later than 7 months of age, and late introduction (as well as early introduction, before 4 months) has been shown to increase the risk of celiac disease.

Finally! Canada has taken a position on food allergens during pregnancy, breastfeeding and introducing solids.

A professor of health psychology in the UK believes if you give your child some veggies in front of the TV they will eat them. So why I do I think this is a poor way to increase your children’s veggie intake?